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5 Tips for Creating a Mobile Learning Program for Employees on the Move

June 13, 2017, Caitlin Bigsby - If you’re considering mobile learning, there’s a good chance your competition is, too — so don’t miss an opportunity to stay ahead of the curve.
5 Tips for Creating a Mobile Learning Program for Employees on the Move

It’s mid-2017 and mobile learning has rapidly become the norm for how people access and share knowledge. And the convenience and flexibility of anytime, anywhere learning — it’s what employees want.

Saba’s 2017 State of Employee Engagement report findings show that anytime, anywhere learning is a big hit with younger workers. In addition, nearly 75 percent of both HR leaders and employees indicated that mobile tools that allow employees to have access to learning materials when and where required are more important or much more important than they were even two or three years ago.

Flexibility for learners
We all know our mobile devices are convenient, but it turns out they may help business communication flourish, too. A recent study found that since people generally have their phones with them throughout the day, emails are answered twice as quickly using a mobile device versus a desktop or laptop.

This easy access to mobile devices applies to learning as well. It’s a piece of cake to take mobile-ready courses when our phones are always with us. That train ride home, waiting in the grocery store checkout line, walking to work, etc. are now “micro moments” to extend opportunities to access information and expertise.

If you’re considering mobile learning, there’s a good chance your competition is, too — so don’t miss an opportunity to stay ahead of the curve. If you’re ready to add mobile learning for your employees, here are five tips to help get started.

Tip 1: Adopt an experimental mindset.
Many companies start with a small pilot program — and some efforts fail before they become a success. But they learned a lot, which is the goal. There’s no right or wrong; it’s a matter of figuring out what works best for your organization.

Tip 2: Choose a project you can turn into a pilot program.
This could be any class, process or a community you think could benefit from mobile learning. Consider adding mobile access to that community’s social group, so people can interact, post thoughts or answer questions even outside of class or after hours.

Tip 3: Evaluate your internal resources. Ask yourself:

  • Is your Learning Management System (LMS) ready? Can it support social learning groups? Even if not, you can still move forward by creating a community in an existing tool (e.g., Slack or Vanilla). Or you could leverage private groups in free sites like LinkedIn or Facebook.
  • Is my content ready? If your content isn’t already in a mobile-friendly format (e.g., PDF, Word, PowerPoint), it may take some time to get it there.
  • How accessible is your content? Make sure your learning platform will index all your content so your learners can quickly and easily find what they need while on the go.

Tip 4: Eliminate a potential financial barrier.
Mobile learning requires data usage. Consider buying some goodwill with your mobile learners by covering their data cost during the pilot program. For about $20 (or 20€), you can provide 2GB of data usage per month.

Tip 5: Run the pilot program like a project. Establish your goals and learning objectives up front. Afterward, ask yourself: Was the tool sufficient? Was the content properly organized? Were there access issues? What needs to change to improve on the performance?

Want to learn more about mobile learning programs?
Smartphones and tablets are amazing devices that enable us to do things that were previously impossible. These devices are making a new way of work possible, and progressive organizations are incorporating the latest social and mobile technology to enable their people to learn anytime, anywhere. Want to learn more? Read how Saba customers have taken flight with mobile learning programs in our brief.  

 

 

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